Robbertse’ study, titled “Genetic diversity, acaricide resistance status and evolutionary potential of a Rhipicephalus microplus population from a disease-controlled cattle farming area in South Africa”, was published as an invited research article in a special edition of the international journal, Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases in 2016. Robbertse, is currently a master’s student at UP Department of Genetics. Her master’s thesis was of such a high standard that it was upgraded to a PhD. Her current PhD study is under the continued supervision of Prof. Christine Maritz-Olivier from the Department of Genetics.

In addition to producing scientific outputs, Robbertse is passionate about translational science and believes that research should not be conducted for the sake of research only, but to contribute to the improvement of quality of life for both animals and humans. According to Robbertse, these findings will therefore soon be effectively converted into real-life actions impacting animal health, ensuring food security in livestock-dependant areas and uplifting resource poor communities via knowledge-based implementation of protective tick control strategies.