Invisible Monsters by Chuck Palahniuk

Invisible Monsters follows the narrative of an unidentified ex-model whose face has been mutilated in an accident. The story is formed by the narrator piecing together bits of non-chronological memories. While recovering from her disfigurement, the narrator meets the glamorous Brandy Alexander – the woman who will change her life more than her accident ever did.

 

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
This dystopian novel is about a futuristic society in which all books are banned and burnt. Fahrenheit 451 has won many awards, but still too few people know about this book and the important message it conveys regarding censorship established by the government. Its main character is loyal to this censorship-driven government, until he meets a girl who is not, and he begins to ask a very important question: “Why?”

 

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
Another dystopian novel set in the future, Brave New World centres around a civilisation where population is constantly controlled and where peace is somehow permanently maintained. This futuristic civilisation bases its ideologies around the ideas of Henry Ford, namely homogeneousness, mass production and uniformity. The novel, written in 1931, offers significant commentary on where the world was headed both

 

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon
This novel, narrated by a teenage boy suffering from what appears to be Asperger’s syndrome, is also the winner of various awards, and not nearly appreciated enough. It gives you a convincing glimpse into the mind of an Asperger’s sufferer, with a gripping, mystery-filled plot to boot.

 

This Side of Paradise by F Scott Fitzgerald
While The Great Gatsby is certainly one of Fitzgerald’s greatest and most famous works, many of his other novels are just as remarkable, and are often overlooked. In the same vein of The Great Gatsby, This Side of Paradise tells of a young man in the midst of the roaring 20’s, searching for himself in a world where love is distorted by voracity and social standing.

 

Image: goodreads.com

 

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